People of Miami celebrate Fidel Castro’s death

‘Good riddance Fidel Castro!’ Hundreds of Cuban-Americans take to the streets of Miami to celebrate the death of the dictator they fled
Thousands of Miamians took to the streets to celebrate Fidel Castro’s death
In Miami tradition, people hit pots and pans together on Saturday morning
Car horns filled the air as locals danced and cheered at the news
Miami is the home to thousands of Cuban-Americans, many of whom fled or have relatives that fled from Castro’s rule beginning in the late 1950s
By KALHAN ROSENBLATT FOR DAILYMAIL.COM
PUBLISHED: 07:25 GMT, 26 November 2016 | UPDATED: 13:10 GMT, 26 November 2016


Cuban-Americans in Miami celebrated the death of communist dictator Fidel Castro early Saturday morning with a Little Havana and Hialeah tradition: Banging pots and pans.

Hundreds of people took to the streets in jubilance after it was announced that Castro had died Friday aged 90.

As people banged the kitchenware rhythmically in Little Havana, others danced in the streets and held their cellphones in the air to record the historic moment.

Miami’s population is 70 percent Hispanic, and Latino and more than half of that population are of Cuban descent.

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Hundreds of people took to the streets of Miami in jubilance after it was announced that Cuban dictator Fidel Castro had died at age 90
Hundreds of people took to the streets of Miami in jubilance after it was announced that Cuban dictator Fidel Castro had died at age 90

As people banged the kitchenware rhythmically in Little Havana, others danced in the streets and held their cellphones in the air to record the historic moment
As people hit the kitchenware rhythmically in Little Havana, others danced in the streets and held their cellphones in the mood to record the historic moment

— Javier Rodriguez (@WEBNtvRodriguez) November 26, 2016
Many have or are relatives of those who fled from Castro’s rule of the island nation of those Cuban-Americans.

As the crowd grew in Miami, car horns filled the air as people cheered and sang Spanish.

Cuban flags waves as more people arrive to celebrate and share the moment.

Miami has been a haven for thousands of Cubans who fled Castro’s rule for America.


Castro was quick to silence his critics, closing independent newspapers and ordering the deaths of at least 582 members of the old government over two years.

Homosexuals in the country were herded into ‘re-education camps,’ and HIV-positive citizens were quarantined.

In 1964, Castro acknowledged holding 15,000 political prisoners. Hundreds of thousands of Cubans fled, including Castro’s daughter Alina Fernandez Revuelta and his younger sister Juana.

The big migration of Cubans to the United States began when Castro-led revolutionaries took over in the late 1950s and early 1960s, according to MigrationPolicy.com.

According to the 15 years after the revolution began, more than half a million Cubans would immigrate to Miami in the Economist.

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